Short Courses

The short courses have limited enrollment and require an additional fee. Registration is based on a first come, first served basis. The deadline for short course registration is January 19. Registrations may be accepted after the deadline (at the meeting) only if space is available.

 

Courses may fill up before the deadline, so early registration is recommended. In order to sign up for a short course, you must also register for the general session. Payment must accompany registration. Phone-in reservations are NOT accepted. Registering online will give you the best chance of being enrolled in a short course..


Course 1: Behold the Powers of Observation: Expanding Your Milk Quality Toolbox with Observational Skills

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 12:30-5:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 20

Fee: $200

Level: All skill levels are welcome, but those participants with intermediate to advanced skill levels may get more out of the course.

Intended audience: This course is structured so that anyone with a role in the global dairy business can benefit from the training.

 

Instructors: Brandon Treichler, Select Milk Producers, Canyon, Texas, USA; and David Reid, Rocky Ridge Dairy Consulting LLC, Hazel Green, Wisconsin, USA

 

This course is designed to provide participants with a real-life milk quality consulting experience, similar to a choose-your-own ending to a book, in a luxurious hotel setting. Using a milk quality case scenario from the instructors’ consulting practices, this course will bring the dairy to you. Course participants will be split into two consulting teams. Each team will be provided with background history of a dairy, current milk quality scenario, as well as management’s goals. Each team will determine and prioritize what tests or diagnostics they want to run, what observations they need to make on the dairy and then analyze these results. Each team will also be allotted 20 minutes to talk with the dairy management in order to ask specific questions. The teams will then develop an action plan for the dairy and make a group presentation to the dairy manager. After hearing both teams’ presentations, the dairy manager will then choose the first ever Virtual Milk Quality Consulting Champion of the World! Both teams will have a chance to debrief with the instructors and walk through the case scenario together.
This course will focus on practical consulting concepts that can go beyond milk quality. Areas such as planning and prioritizing your visit, developing a strategy, understanding and analyzing milk quality data, practical troubleshooting concepts, structuring an interview, as well as presentation skills will be emphasized. The course will not focus on any equipment testing or facility observation, as much as it will on determining and selecting which tests to run and observations to make.
We are keeping group sizes small to allow for more one-on-one interaction with instructors. We are purposely scheduling a five-hour course to allow more group discussion and more teaching opportunities. The course may wrap up sooner, but the instructors will be available for the full timeslot.
At this time, no course handouts are planned. However, this may change as we get closer to the meeting date. We encourage you to bring materials to take notes in whatever format you like. Most of the course will be far too action packed to be taking notes, but we thoroughly expect some teachable moments and valuable pointers to come up in the debrief session.

Note: Participants should be prepared to be both active and collaborative. Grumpy and mean persons need not apply!

 

Topics:

  • Diagnostic interview skills
  • Prioritization
  • Critical Thinking
  • Planning and strategizing
  • Collaborative teamwork

Course 2: Practical Mastitis Problem-solving Strategies

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 20

Fee: $125

Level: Beginner to intermediate

Intended audience: Those who provide mastitis solutions to dairy producers

 

Instructor: Peter Edmondson, UdderWise Global Mastitis Solutions, Shepton Mallet, Somerset, UK

 

This is a very interactive workshop where you will be working in small groups and solving mastitis problems. Farmer Charles in the United Kingdom built a new 500-cow dairy. Since then, he has been having up to 50 cases of mastitis per month. He needs your help to solve his problem. Rather than taking you to the farm, we are bringing the farm to you in the form of a virtual tour using photos, all the management information you need, along with bacteriology, cell count and clinical mastitis records.

 

Topics:

  • Diagnosis of clinical mastitis outbreak – bacteria and stage of lactation
  • Practical problem-solving skills
  • Clinical mastitis economics
  • Prioritization and implementation of mastitis solutions

Course 3: Machine Milking: Myths, Legends, Facts and Figures

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 50

Fee: $125

Level: Advanced

Intended audience: Milking machine users, on-farm managers, field advisors, designers, installers and maintenance personnel

 

Instructor: Doug Reinemann, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

 

This course will provide an overview of the materials presented in the recently published book, “Machine Milking: Volume 1,” by Graeme Mein and Doug Reinemann. Topics include: action of the teatcup and responses of the teat – considerations for assessing and choosing liners; choosing vacuum levels, pulsator settings and automatic cluster removal settings; and milking machines and mastitis risk.

 

Topics:

  • Considerations for assessing and choosing liners
  • Selecting vacuum levels, pulsator settings and automatic cluster removal settings
  • Milking machines and mastitis risk

Course 4: Building Your Dairy Advocacy Skills, Step by Step

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 40

Fee: $125

Level: Beginner to advanced

Intended audience: All dairy industry representatives

 

Instructor: Stan Erwine, Dairy Management Inc., Rosemont, Illinois, USA

 

Participants will learn why they need to acquire/enhance their skills in communicating dairy’s story to consumer audiences in today’s marketplace. They will construct and practice the elements of their personal dairy story, with an emphasis on values and commitment. They will learn how to address difficult consumer questions around animal care and responsible use of antibiotics through a framework of “Listen-Ask-Share.” They will receive tools, materials and resources needed to communicate with friends, family and associates, and, over time, add their expert voice to inform consumers, answer their questions and foster understanding, support and confidence in dairy.

 

Topics:

  • Why a new way of communicating with consumers is needed
  • Constructing and practicing your personal dairy story
  • Responding to difficult consumer questions around animal care and antibiotics
  • Making best use of consumer communication techniques, tools and materials

Course 5: CIP: Understanding Chemistry, Mechanics and Testing to Ensure Quality Milk and Milk Premiums

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 40

Fee: $125

Level: Intermediate

Intended audience: Producers, veterinarians, consultants and milk processors who address milk quality issues relating to proper equipment cleaning and sanitizing

 

Instructors: Allan Britten, Udder Health Systems, Boise, Idaho, USA; and Robert Corbett, Dairy Health Consultation, Spring City, Utah, USA; and Tom Hemling, TCH Animal Health LLP, Kansas City, Missouri, USA

 

With international trade of dairy products increasing, global demands for milk quality are also increasing. With the current global milk production excess, milk purchasers are further motivated to purchase only the highest quality milk. China is even playing a major role in setting international milk quality standards. Proper cleaning and sanitizing of milking equipment helps ensure milk quality is maintained. Standard testing, such as bulk tank culture, lab pasteurized count (LPC) and preliminary incubation count (PIC), are used to define milk quality. Milk quality is assessed by various processors using different tests with differing cutoff levels to define acceptable milk or to determine payment of quality premiums or penalties. As farms vary significantly in size, milking system type and water quality, milking troubleshooting issues are often problematic.

 

This course will address issues and options for cleaning and sanitizing routines on modern dairies. We will discuss options for product selection to address various water qualities and selection options to reduce total cleaning time, total water use and energy. The mechanics of cleaning will also be reviewed to ensure the cleaning process operates at peak efficiency. Milk quality testing will be reviewed to provide understanding of the test and how results can be interpreted to resolve quality issues.

 

Topics:

  • Tests to diagnose bulk tank
  • Interpreting LPC, PIC and other results
  • Solutions based on test results
  • Cleaning and sanitizing product options

Course 6: An Organized Approach to Developing a Long-term Action Plan for Herds with Poor Teat Ends

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 30

Fee: $125

Level: Intermediate to advanced. A general understanding of milking routines, milking equipment function, the Teat Club International Scoring System and the use of parlor reports from Dairy Comp 305 will help participants get the most out of this course.

Intended audience: Milk quality consultants, dairy producers, milking equipment personnel and veterinarians

 

Instructors: Paul Virkler, Quality Milk Production Services, Ithaca, New York; and Rick Watters, Quality Milk Production Services, Warsaw, New York

 

This course will focus on how to systematically approach the challenge of identifying and correcting an issue of poor teat ends. We will start with how to collect what we consider the 11 critical pieces of data needed in order to establish a baseline of information. Then, we will use the data we have collected from individual farms to discuss how to analyze, interpret and develop an action plan. Finally, we will conclude with what has happened over time on these farms as a framework for outlining what type of follow-up we think is important. As anyone knows who has been involved in these investigations, there is no single solution to these problems. Therefore, this course is designed to be interactive and discussion based in order to pool together the collective wisdom of the audience for the benefit of all participants.

 

Topics:

  • Influences on teat end scores
  • Milking routines
  • Milking equipment
  • Parlor reports

 


Course 7: Engaged Employees: The Connection between Protocols and Performances

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 24

Fee: $125

Level: Beginner to intermediate

Intended audience: Veterinarians, dairy producers/managers and other allied professionals

 

Instructors: Ron Erskine and Rhyannon Moore-Foster, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; and Michelle Borek-Stine, Thumb Veterinary Services, Sandusky, Michigan, USA

 

Milk quality protocols should be based on the science of mastitis prevention, diagnostic and therapeutic tools, and milking equipment function. However, dairy managers have to balance ideal protocols against practical constraints of facilities, climate and economic factors. Increasingly, protocols are also skewed by the realities of employee management. What are potential opportunities for dairy producers and allied professionals to better engage employees to participate in milk quality? This short course will explore how to link a science-based farm evaluation to employee training and teaching to attain high milk quality and employee performance. The format will be interactive and case examples from farms will be included, as well as breakout group discussions.

 

Topics:

  • Mastitis protocols
  • Employees
  • Evaluation system

Course 8: Managing Large Dairy Herds: The Consultant’s Role

Date and time: Sunday, January 29, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 25

Fee: $125

Level: Intermediate

Intended audience: All dairy industry sectors

 

Instructors: Tom Fuhrmann

 

Dairy consultants can provide invaluable information for large dairy owners and managers. Possessing technical expertise doesn’t guarantee success for the client or the consultant. First, the consultant needs to be positioned and available to his/her client. Second, the consultant’s recommendations should be appropriate and specific to the dairy manager’s needs. Finally, the recommendations need to be practically implementable. Management strategy implementation may also be a limiting factor; many dairy owners/managers struggle to modify their approach when new concepts are recommended.

This interactive seminar will clarify the three-point definition of management and describe a five-step implementation plan. Practical examples of management strategy implementation for dairies will be used throughout the seminar, with special emphasis on the consultant’s role to improve milking parlor management. Opportunities for dairy consultants to assist their clients/customers will become apparent throughout the seminar discussion. This seminar will not focus on technical aspects of milk quality; rather, it will build on the presenter’s experience regarding how consultants impact management through their recommendations. By the end of the seminar, attendees will be able to better evaluate management deficiencies that exist on clients’/customers’ dairy operations and re-evaluate the roles they or their companies can play when providing service or products to these dairy managers.

 

Topics:

  • Management principles specific for large dairy enterprises
  • Challenges dairy owners/managers experience when implementing management strategies
  • Role and opportunities for consultants regarding management improvement for their clients/customers

Course 9: Using DairyComp 305 to Evaluate Parlor Performance

Date and time: Tuesday, January 31, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 30

Fee: $125

Level: Beginner, but requires some familiarity with on-farm parlor performance data

Intended audience: Dairy producers and consultants

 

Instructors: David Reid, Rocky Ridge Dairy Consulting LLC, Hazel Green, Wisconsin; and Steve Stewart, Valley Agricultural Software, Tulare, California, USA

 

The course will cover in detail the numbers found on typical parlor performance reports. The main emphasis will be on DairyComp 305 reports but will also review the major milking equipment companies’ parlor data and reports. The goals are to understand how the numbers are determined, the factors that influence the numbers and what data are best utilized for routine analysis of milk harvest technician performance.

 

Topics:

  • Parlor performance reports
  • DairyComp 305 reports
  • Best data to use for analyzing milk harvest technician performance

Course 10: Practical Application of Evidence-based Strategies for Treatment of Clinical Mastitis

Date and time: Tuesday, January 31, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 25

Fee: $125

Level: Intermediate

Intended audience: Veterinarians and others who directly treat or supervise treatments of clinical mastitis on dairy farms

Instructors: Pamela Ruegg, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

This interactive course will provide an opportunity for participants to formulate and discuss treatment protocols for clinical mastitis with other participants. In the first portion of this short course, learners will be exposed to research-based evidence about treatment of clinical mastitis. The emphasis will be on understanding the important role of etiology in making treatment decisions. Factors that influence the probability of the case responding to antimicrobial therapy will be discussed. In the second half of the session, learners will divide into groups and formulate treatment strategies for model cases of mastitis. Some cases will include results of on-farm cultures and reflect the reality of many on-farm situations. Data will not be available for all cases. Treatment strategies for each case will be presented and discussed among all course participants.

Topics:

  • Etiology of clinical mastitis on modern dairy farms
  • Appropriate use of antimicrobials on dairy farms
  • Implementation of practical treatment strategies for clinical mastitis

Course 11: Food Armor: Judicious Antibiotic Use, it’s Easier than You Think

Date and time: Tuesday, January 31, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 30

Fee: $125

Level: Intermediate

Intended audience: Dairy producers or managers, veterinarians and other dairy industry professionals who consult on clinical mastitis management programs for dairy farms

 

Instructors: Katie Mrdutt, Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; and Richard Wallace, Zoetis, McFarland, Wisconsin, USA

The Food Armor Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) for Proper Drug Use Program is a nationally recognized, voluntary, verifiable food safety program for the U.S. dairy industry. Proper implementation of a HACCP plan for proper drug use will ensure food safety, as well as transparency and accountability for judicious drug use customized for individual dairy farms. This comprehensive program is action-plan oriented, defining veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR) responsibilities, drugs used specific to the individual farm, treatment protocols used, standard operating procedures (SOP) followed, records kept and oversight of drug use. The program concepts apply for all drugs used on dairies, regardless of disease condition, but this short course will focus on how to apply Food Armor concepts specific to clinical mastitis. With antibiotic stewardship being a front-and-center topic in the dairy industry, everyone who has a role or interest in residue prevention and appropriate drug use needs to be involved in these discussions.

Topics:

  • Food safety
  • Responsible and judicious drug use
  • VCPR
  • Clinical mastitis

Course 12: Facility Management in Hot and Humid Climates

Date and time: Tuesday, January 31, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Class size limit: 50

Fee: $125

Level: Intermediate

Intended audience: Dairy producers, academia and industry representatives

 

Instructors: Jeffrey Bewley, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA;  Peter Krawczel , University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA; Steve Nickerson, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA; Amanda Stone, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, USA; and Stephanie Ward, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

 

The southeastern United States historically maintains a higher somatic cell count than the rest of the nation.  Dairy producers in the Southeast are faced with unique environmental challenges that are often perceived as uncontrollable.  Hot and humid summers are stressful for cows and producers, but they are in fact manageable with the right tools and protocols. This short course will examine ways for producers to improve housing in order to improve milk quality.  Results will be presented from the Southeast Quality Milk Initiative, a six-state, U.S. Department of  Agriculture-funded project that explores ways to help producers improve milk quality while trying to understand the hurdles that producers have to overcome in order to maintain competitiveness in the industry.  The format will be presentation based and farm data will be included.

 

Topics:

  • How housing systems affect milk quality
  • Compost bedded pack barn management techniques
  • How heat stress affects milk quality
  • Heat abatement strategies